What's My Share? May 3, 2016

Carrots, radishes, dill, green leaf lettuce, red leaf lettuce, bok choy, red Russian kale, spring onions, and three pints of strawberries

Carrots, radishes, dill, green leaf lettuce, red leaf lettuce, bok choy, red Russian kale, spring onions, and three pints of strawberries

The season is really in full swing now, with so much produce I can hardly fit it in a single photo! This week, I am particularly excited about two new recipes: one for a spicy coconut bok choy soup and the other for divine strawberry ice cream from Emily Blount of the new restaurant, Saint Leo, which will open in Oxford in mid-June.

See below for tips on how to store and prepare the two new items in this week’s share: red Russian kale and dill.
 

What’s My Share?

  • carrots
  • radishes
  • dill
  • bok choy
  • green leaf lettuce
  • red leaf lettuce
  • red Russian kale
  • spring onions
  • strawberries, 3 pints
     

What’s New This Week?

Dill

Dill is most often used in pickling, or with fish, in egg dishes, in cheese spreads, or on vegetables. I like to add a few sprinkles of fresh dill to omelets and lettuce salads. Store dry in a plastic bag lined with a paper towel. I’m going to experiment with storing it in the fridge in a vase of water, since my vase of cut parsley is still going strong after three weeks! I’ll let you know how it goes. Check out 8 Recipes to Use Up a Bunch of Dill.

Red Russian Kale

While some may use red Russian kale in salads or smoothies, this particular variety of kale is best cooked. If your kale starts to wilt, fill a large bowl with ice water and immerse the greens for a few minutes. They will perk right up! To store, first remove any excess moisture in a salad spinner or pat dry. Then place in the crisper in a plastic bag lined with paper towels. To prepare, strip away and discard the stems—no amount of cooking will soften them. Then blanche in salted water, drain and sauté. Red Russian kale tastes great cooked in olive oil or nut oil, or stock for a stronger flavor. Season with any of the following: bacon, sausage, olives, garlic, cumin, chili, caraway, fennel, anise. Cook until tender, but keep in mind this kale will always be on the tougher side. The longer and slower you cook it, the sweeter it will taste. More recipes for red Russian kale here.
 

What’s on the Menu?

Emily’s Strawberry Ice Cream 

Bok Choy in Coconut Milk 

Grilled Carrots with Lemon and Dill